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News from Monmouth County, New Jersey

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    Andreas Erazo, 18, faces life in prison after he was indicted earlier this month on charges he sexually assaulted and fatally stabbed 11-year-old AbbieGail Smith.

    KEANSBURG - The teen accused of sexually assaulting an 11-year-old girl before he stabbed her to death in Keansburg pleaded not guilty Monday to multiple charges in the slaying. 

    Andreas Erazo, 18, was indicted earlier this month on charges he raped and killed  AbbieGail "Abbie" Smith on July 12 at the Hancock Arms apartment complex.

    Erazo's defense team waived the reading of the indictment as they entered the not guilty plea before Superior Court Judge David Bauman at the Monmouth County courthouse. Erazo appeared in a yellow, jail-issued jumpsuit while AbbieGail's family sat in the front row of the courtroom. 

    Prosecutors said Erazo has admitted he stabbed AbbieGail after they confronted him with evidence. Before he stabbed her, Erazo sexually assaulted her, according to the indictment. AbbieGail died from stab wounds to her neck, authorities said. 

    Detectives found AbbieGail's body bound with a computer cord and wrapped in a comforter and bed sheet on the roof of a shed outside the window of Erazo's apartment.

    Erazo lived in an apartment above AbbieGail's family in the complex.

    After killing of 11-year-old girl, an N.J. community searches for answers

    Prosecutors are seeking life in prison without parole and are not offering a plea agreement to Erazo. 

    Erazo, who remains in the Monmouth County jail pending trial, was described by people who knew him as having a pattern of lashing out in anger. One said he "literally had demons he was fighting."

    Erazo's attorneys have challenged the prosecutor's account of his alleged confession.

    "At no point during this interrogation did Mr. Erazo admit the knowing and purposeful murder, which are the necessary elements of this offense the state must prove beyond a reasonable doubt," Courtney Schneider, a public defender representing Erazo, said in a previous court hearing.

    Relatives and friends who spoke through tears at her funeral remembered AbbieGail as a "beautiful soul" who loved to make people laugh.

    "We want to hold your hand and see your face, but you were taken from us and we don't know why," her aunt, Sonja Bennett, said at the service. "She made me smile when no one else could."

    Staff writer Alex Napoliello contributed to this report. 

    Luke Nozicka may be reached at lnozicka@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @lukenozicka.

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    Karen Borkowski, 66, was fatally struck by an off-duty Long Branch police officer as she crossed Boulevard Avenue last month. Watch video

    LONG BRANCH -  When Karen Borkowski was fatally struck by a car driven by an off-duty Long Branch officer last month, she was attempting to cross the street to purchase bandages at a CVS to care for her husband.

    Karen Borkowski.jpegKaren Borkowski, 66, of Stanhope. (Courtesy of Legacy.com)

    That errand embodied the kind, caring person she was, according to her husband Ed Borkowski

    "My wife was wonderful 99 percent of the time," Borkowski said in a phone interview on Sunday, a month after the fatal crash on Boulevard Avenue in Long Branch. "My wife was right 99 percent of the time and she always corrected me. And the one time that I was right, I told her not to go across the street to get the bandages."

    As Karen Borkowski, 66, crossed the street just after 8 p.m. on Sept. 22, she was hit by off-duty Long Branch police Officer Jake Pascucci. Borkowski was pronounced dead at the scene.

    Pascucci told officers at the scene he had a green light and that Karen Borkowski was jaywalking. He said he swerved to try and avoid her, but couldn't get out of the way in time.

    Pascucci was cited on Friday for reckless and careless driving. Authorities said criminal charges are being considered pending further investigation. 

    Ed Borkowski said he and his wife were at the Ocean Place hotel in Long Branch that weekend as representatives of the Baptist church in Ledgewood for the American Baptist Churches of New Jersey conference. That weekend was the anniversary of Ed and Karen Borkowski's baptism in the ocean off Long Branch. Their church sent them there to watch three younger members of the church who were set to go through the same ceremony.

    Before the crash, the Borkowskis had a "wonderful meal" at the hotel that lasted for hours, Ed Borkowski said.

    Ed Borkowski, who is wheelchair-bound, suffered an aneurysm in 2015 and also has lymphedema, which causes him to get severe blisters on his legs. The blisters were acting up that night, so his wife wanted to purchase bandages for him, he said.

    Karen Borkowski left to visit a nearby CVS, but never returned. Ed Borkowski finally went to the hotel's security officers to ask about his wife. The security guard left and returned in five minutes with seven Long Branch police officers, who told Ed Borkowski what had happened.

    "I want my wife to be honored and understood, and I want the world to understand they lost a very good person," Ed Borkowski said.

    Karen Borkowski was a full-time caregiver. She cared for a woman who suffered from cerebral palsy, living at the woman's household while also caring for her husband.

    At the same time, every morning at 6 a.m. she would drive 10 miles from their home in Stanhope to where her daughter Bekki lived in Byram Township to get her two children ready for school. One of the children, Drew, suffers from severe autism.

    "We figured we'd have to hire 50 people for what (Karen Borkowski) did," Ed Borkowski said. "It's been really tough."

    A friend of the family is raising money to get a service dog for Drew to help keep him safe.

    A veteran of the Vietnam era, Karen Borkowski was in the nurse corps. She was honorably discharged and then shifted careers. She was a manager at Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield and worked at Prudential.

    Borkowski worked for ADP and would travel frequently to give training sessions on taxes. She retired from the business world and then started teaching swim lessons. She did that for 20 years until Hurricane Sandy destroyed the pool where she taught in Landing.

    It's there she met Kathy Taft, the woman who suffers from cerebral palsy, and began working with her by giving her swim lessons and aquatic exercises.

    "She was always generous with her time and always shared her love," Karen Borkowski's obituary says. "She helped others realize their full potential in all she did."

    She was also a Eucharistic minister at her church, Girl Scout leader, Red Cross instructor and a volunteer for "Family Promise," a program that helps homeless and low-income families.

    Ed Borkowski said he's been overcome with emotions since his wife's death but doesn't want revenge for the off-duty officer who killed her.

    "I just want justice," he said. "And, as far as I'm concerned, it's not my will but God's will. We'll find out. He (God) is going to find out how to do it and Karen is probably up there telling him what to do."

    Alex Napoliello may be reached at anapoliello@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @alexnapoNJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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    A look at the top games in girls soccer for the upcoming week.


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    A sprawling new multiplex from Cinemark - the third largest movie-theater chain in the United States - is planned for Willowbrook Mall by 2019, township officials said Monday.

    WAYNE - A sprawling new multiplex from Cinemark - the third largest movie-theater chain in the United States - is planned for Willowbrook Mall by 2019, township officials said Monday.

    The 12-auditorium, 44,000-square-foot theater with plush seating, ceiling-to-floor screens and state-of-the-art digital sound system will be built where the Sears Auto Center now stands at 50 U.S. 46, according to plans approved Oct. 10 by the Wayne Township Planning Board.

    Seritage SRC Finance will raze the existing Sears and build the new theater along with an illuminated sign standing 80 feet tall and eight feet wide, according to Linda Lutz, acting township planner.

    "The theater will have those big, reclining lounge chairs," Lutz said Monday. Cinemark calls the electric-powered, oversize, lounge chairs with footrests and cup holders "luxury loungers."

    The new theater, which will contain a large concession area and arcade, will be built in walking distance from the 14-screen AMC Loews multiplex on Willowbrook Boulevard.

    Cinemark has two other theaters in New Jersey, one in Hazlet the other in Somerdale.

    In August, Cinemark was given the OK to build a 10-screen theater off Route 22 in Watchung.

    Cinemark has 337 theaters and 4,544 screens in 41 states.

    Anthony G. Attrino may be reached at tattrino@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @TonyAttrino. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    Schneider's Restaurant in Avon-by-the-Sea was destroyed by a fire early Saturday.

    AVON-BY-THE-SEA - A fire that destroyed a decades-old restaurant in Avon-by-the-Sea early Saturday was ruled accidental, authorities said.

    Schneider's Restaurant on Main Street in the tiny seaside borough of Avon-by-the-Sea had been serving authentic German-Austrian-Hungarian dishes and homemade ice cream since 1970. Before that, the Schneider family owned a candy store in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Newark.

    But at around 4 a.m. on Saturday, a fire gutted the Avon-by-the-Sea restaurant and left the current owner, Johann "John" Schneider, 74, in disbelief.

    "It's devastating," he said on Sunday. "You think it's a nightmare. ... You're sort of not sure if you're watching a movie in your dreams, but then reality sets in. You look at it and you walk around, and it's surreal and devastating."

    On Monday, a spokesman for the Monmouth County Prosecutor's Office, Charles Webster, said there does not appear to be "a criminal component to the incident."

    "It was determined the fire was accidental," Webster said in an email.

    He could not comment on the cause of the blaze and where it originated.

    "Right now, all I can tell you is there is an active and ongoing investigation," Webster said. "Once that is complete, I may be able to better answer your question."

    No injuries were reported as a result of the fire, which tore through the inside of the building, leaving beams charred and heat damage in areas the fire didn't spread to.

    John Schneider said his family would survey the damage on Monday and determine what, if anything, could be salvaged.

    Peter and Theresia Schneider opened up Strubbe's on Clinton Avenue in Newark in 1960. It was a candy store and an ice cream parlor, where skilled employees would chit-chat and craft hand-dipped chocolates. On holidays, lines extended out the door for the chocolate hearts and rabbits. 

    On his day off, Peter Schneider would go down to the Jersey Shore. He fell in love with the area and in 1968-69, he relocated the family business to Avon-by-the-Sea, a tiny seaside borough located just north of Belmar in Monmouth County. 

    John Schneider said the chocolates weren't as popular at the Jersey Shore, but people loved the ice cream, especially in the summer.

    Theresia Schneider, known as "Mrs. Schneider" or "mom" to the locals, used to cook for the merchants near her husband's shop in Newark. She incorporated her German-Austrian-Hungarian style dishes at the new location in Avon-by-the-Sea.

    Peter Schneider passed away in 1975. But Mrs. Scheider, 94, continued to work the deli section of the shop, preparing dinner platters with meatloaf and mashed potatoes, sauerbraten, roast pork, bratwurst, among others.

    Alex Napoliello may be reached at anapoliello@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @alexnapoNJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    A Wall Street rating agency had a declaration Monday for three counties most affected by the 2012 storm. Watch video

    KEANSBURG -- Gov. Chris Christie on Monday began a weeklong commemoration of the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy on the same day a Wall Street rating agency declared that the three counties most affected by the storm are "fully recovered" financially.

    Moody's Investors Service said in a new report that Atlantic, Monmouth, and Ocean counties are also prepared for the next major coastal storm thanks to "infrastructure improvement, healthy economies, and strong finances." 

    The news came as Christie held a press conference in Keansburg to announce a $75 million expansion of a state and federal program to buy up homes repeatedly hit by flooding. 

    Christie: I never said Trump was done if he ignored opioids

    "We're getting recognition now from a number of different spots, including the rating agencies, that the recovery from Sandy after five years in our shore counties is complete," Christie told reporters. 

    "Now, that doesn't mean that every family is back in their home," he added. "But what it does mean is that we started with 365,000 homes that were damaged, and we're now at about 1,000 homes that are still left -- need to be handled to get families back in."

    Christie also claimed that New Jersey's recovery from the 2012 storm is now outpacing New York's as well as Louisiana and Mississippi's recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

    "We made some mistakes in the beginning that we learned from and we corrected," Christie said. "You've got lots of people who sit on the sidelines and have never done anything like this who all are geniuses."

    Critics have long claimed that Sandy recovery under Christie's administration has been slow, with some suggesting the governor has downplayed the number of people still waiting to return to their homes.

    The Fair Share Housing Center, a frequent critic, said Monday that despite Christie's new claim, more than 2,000 families are still up in the air.

    Moody's said Monday that the Shore's recovery was "largely due to quick and robust rebuilding efforts following Sandy."

    "This includes new building construction and retrofitting existing buildings to meet stronger building codes," the agency said. "These rebuilding improvements and adjustments have considerable credit impact, because they will help prevent damage to property and prevent tax appeals."

    On Monday, Christie announced an additional $75 million for the state and federally funded Blue Acres program, in which people in flood-prone areas can sell their homes to the state at pre-flood market values. 

    The homes are then demolished and converted into open space to prevent future flooding, the governor explained.

    "If we get these homes purchased, give those people a new start, and also create more open space in some of these towns, that'll help significantly to make the towns more livable and more pleasant and will help the folks who otherwise have been damaged by some of the storms that we've had," Christie said during the news conference in front of homes along Waackaack Creek in Keansburg -- one of the towns on the list where homeowners have agreed to buyouts.

    Christie rebuffed criticism from some that demolishing these homes takes money away from the town because the houses are off the tax roll.

    "Would you rather have that or would you rather have people continuing to have their lives and their homes and their resources destroyed?" the governor said. "How many times can people go through that?"

    Since Christie's administration started making Blue Acres offers to Sandy victims in 2013, 689 offers have been accepted, 610 sales have been closed, and 475 homes have been demolished, the governor's office said. The program is already active in 14 towns. 

    None of the homes have been along the ocean. Instead, they have been along rivers and bays. 

    Those interested in the program can call (609) 984-0500 or visit this website

    But frequent Christie critic Jeff Tittel, the New Jersey director of the environmental group Sierra Club, warned that New Jersey still doesn't have "a stable source of funding" for the issue and express worry that the state isn't "buying out homes along the coast."

    Christie -- whose approval ratings reached into the 70s in the wake of Sandy but have since fallen into the teens -- is expected to spend all week recognizing Sandy's five-year anniversary at events across the state, his office said.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

    Brent Johnson may be reached at bjohnson@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @johnsb01. Find NJ.com Politics on Facebook.


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    The owner of a computer school in Eatontown didn't adhere to rules established by the Department of Veterans Affairs

    TRENTON -- The owner of a computer training school program in Monmouth County was sentenced Monday to two years in prison for stealing $2.8 million from a federally funded program for veterans.

    Elizabeth Honig, 52, of the Morganville section of Marlboro, previously pleaded guilty to theft of government funds. 

    Honig was also ordered to pay $2,831,455 in restitution, the U.S. Attorney's Office for New Jersey said Monday. She will be subject to three years of supervised released after completing her prison stint.

    Honing, the owner of Computer Insight Learning Center in Eatontown, helped 182 veterans receive funding under a federal program intended to help older, unemployed veterans receive training for high-demand occupations. But the majority of those veterans were either ineligible or were not actually attending the training, authorities said.

    Man stole $250K in Sandy funds, authorities say

    She also told the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Labor they were enrolled in her Business Software Applications Program, a 14-week, $4,000 course.

    Sixty-two of the veterans, however, lived out of state, and Honig's school was not approved for online education. Veterans did not attend for the required hours, quit before the course was completed or in many instances never attended at all. Honig failed to notify the VA of any significant non-attendance, as she was legally required to do.

    Honig's monthly fee of approximately $750 also resulted in over-payments by veterans far in excess of the VA approved $4,000 course tuition.

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    These videos are fun and adorable


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    A local photographer captured a humpback whale sailing close to the shore of Belmar Beach. Watch video

    Swimsuit season may be over, but it may not be time to leave the beach just yet. In fact, if you're looking to spot a whale, now may be the best time to head to a beach in Atlantic or Monmouth counties. 

    Photographer Bill McKim captured a humpback whale within 100 yards of the shore of Belmar Beach on Sunday.

    On Facebook, the Cape May Whale Watcher group posted pictures of a humpback whale and 50 dolphins on Friday. 

    "It's a rare and beautiful thing and something that you just have to stop and see." said Bill McKim, the photographer who captured video and photographs of the mammal.  

    Those looking for right whales should be heading to the beach soon, according to Captain Glen Foulke of Carrie Lynn Fishing Charters.

    "The second week of November is usually the best season to see them because that's when the waters are getting just right [about 50 degrees]," said Foulke, who says he sees about five or six whales a day. 

    However, potential whale watchers may want to go soon according to Bob Schoelkopf, the director of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center, a private, non-profit group in Brigantine that has rescued more than 1,900 sea turtles since 1978.

    Some species of whales are enjoying the last week or two of warm weather before they head south to Puerto Rico or the Dominican Republic, Schoelkopf said. 

    The Marine Mammal Stranding Center is also still in the process of investigating the deaths of a pgymy sperm whale and her baby calf earlier in October. In April, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Fisheries declared a unusual mortality event after the death of 41 humpback whales this year along the Atlantic coast.  

    According to Deborah Fauquier, a veterinary medical officer at NOAA, the death toll for humpback whales has now risen to 56. 

    In a lot of cases dealing with both whales and dolphins, Schoelkopf says the animals catch bacterial infections.

    "Unfortunately, it happens," Schoelkopf said. "Unlike us they aren't able to get shots to protect themselves." 

    Taylor Tiomoyo Harris may be reached at tharris@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @ladytiamoyo.

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    Highlighting some of Week 7's best performances.


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    There are six group titles up for grabs. Who takes the crowns?


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    The new citizens took their oaths at a naturalization ceremony - the first in 30 years at the Trenton federal courthouse

    TRENTON -- They came to New Jersey from countries around the world - Azerbaijan to Tanzania.

    On Tuesday, they raised their hands and became Americans.

    The 34 new U.S. citizens swore the Oath of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at the Clarkson S. Fisher Building & U.S. Courthouse in Trenton.

    Presiding Judge Freda Wolfson, a first-generation American, welcomed the applicants, saying: "I am honored to extend my congratulations to all of you who have come to our nation from 18 different countries around the world."

    She pointed out that it was the first time in more than 30 years that the ceremony was held in, "this beautiful and majestic courthouse."

    46 new Americans take oath as U.S. citizens

    "I see in you the hope of America's future. A more diverse America makes us a stronger America," Trenton Mayor Eric Jackson told the new citizens.

    New Jersey Attorney General Christopher Porrino told the story of his Egyptian wife and her parents and brother, all who became citizens in 1976.

    When he asked his mother-in-law mother what it felt like the day she took her oath, Porrino recalled, "Upon becoming a citizen, she felt secure with her freedom."

    "Congratulations, good luck and may you always feel secure with your freedom," Porrino told the citizens.

    The Roar Singers from nearby International Academy of Trenton, performed the National Anthem and led the Pledge of Allegiance, under the direction of Christian Simmons.

    The federal courthouse is also hosting a naturalization ceremony, in Trenton, in December.

    Michael Mancuso may be reached at mmancuso@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @michaelmancuso Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The bottom half of the Top 20 has a much different look.


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    Live coverage of the boys soccer state tournament seeding meeting.

    The boys soccer state tournament will be officially seeded at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday at the NJSIAA headquarters in Robbinsville.

    NJ Advance Media will have live coverage of the meeting, posting seeds, pairings and brackets as they are completed. Follow along in the comments section below for live updates during the meeting.

    Ahead of the meeting, feel free to drop any questions or comments below and we will do our best to answer it.

    For reference, here are the final power points through Saturday's state tournament cutoff.

    NORTH JERSEY

    Non-Public A: Delbarton (15-0-1) 379.75; Seton Hall Prep (17-2-1) 366.0; St. Peter's Prep (13-4-1) 316.5; Don Bosco Prep (11-1-3) 311.25; Pingry (10-4-1) 260.75; Bergen Catholic (9-3-3) 247.50; St. Joseph (Mont.) (11-4) 221.0; Oratory (8-6-1) 209.75; Union Catholic (7-3-2) 194.75; Paramus Catholic (1-14) 94.5; Pope John (0-13-1) 87.25; Frisch (0-0) 0.

    Non-Public B: Morris Catholic (12-2-1) 277.25; Hawthorne Christian (12-4-1) 246.5; Montclair Kimberley (7-6-3) 228.0; Dwight-Englewood (9-6) 204.0; Hudson Catholic (10-5) 187.5; Golda Och (7-6) 150.0; Saddle River Day (4-10) 104; DePaul (2-10-1) 101.75; Eastern Christian (1-13-2) 98.0; Newark Academy (3-8) 96; Morristown-Beard (2-16) 85; Christ the King (1-9) 65; St. Mary (Ruth.) (0-14) 63; Marist (0-13) 56; Roselle Catholic (0-9) 53; Al-Ghazaly (0-3) 22.

    SOUTH JERSEY

    Non-Public A: Christian Brothers (16-2-1) 315.0; Bishop Eustace (14-2-1) 283.5; St. Augustine (9-6-3) 249.5; St. Joseph (Met.) (8-9) 227.5; Notre Dame (6-8-3) 180.0; Donovan Catholic (5-10-2) 163.0; Red Bank Catholic (4-14) 122.5; St. John Vianney (3-10-1) 105.5; Bishop Ahr (3-11) 102.5; Camden Catholic (0-14) 77; Paul VI (1-14-1) 76.

    Non-Public B: Gill St. Bernard's (8-6-1) 240.5; Timothy Christian (12-3-1) 235.5; Immaculata (7-7) 228.0; Wildwood Catholic (12-3) 194.5; Moorestown Friends (8-3-4) 190.00; St. Rose (8-10-1) 166; Trenton Catholic (5-7) 139; Ranney (4-10-1) 122; Holy Cross (5-10) 121; Rutgers Prep (4-12) 111.0; Mater Dei (4-11) 109; Wardlaw-Hartridge (3-12) 99.5; Calvary Christian (Old Bridge) (4-8-1) 96.5; St. Joseph (Hamm.) (5-12) 96.5; Gloucester Catholic (2-9-1) 93.5; Doane Academy (1-12-1) 78; Holy Spirit (2-14) 70.

    NORTH JERSEY, SECTION 1

    Group 4: Kearny (14-0-3) 404.5; Morris Knolls (15-2-1) 345.5; Montclair (11-1-1) 323.25; Bergen Tech (11-3-1) 295.5; Fair Lawn (9-7-1) 270.25; North Bergen (9-7-1) 262.5; West Orange (10-3-4) 259.75; Clifton (11-5-1) 250.25; Passaic (11-5-2) 247.5; Mount Olive (12-5-1) 241.25; Union City (8-6) 231.5; Ridgewood (7-6-1) 223.75; Passaic Tech (8-5-3) 212.5; Hackensack (5-8) 197.0; Randolph (7-7) 189.0; Bloomfield (8-9) 171.0; Livingston (4-11) 153.0; Memorial (5-9) 131.5; Morristown (3-12) 109.5; Paterson Eastside (2-13) 88; Paterson Kennedy (1-17) 83.

    Group 3: Ramapo (12-2) 300.0; Northern Highlands (9-3-1) 288.25; Old Tappan (9-2-2) 277.75; Passaic Valley (10-3-3) 255.75; Wayne Hills (9-3-5) 253.50; Pascack Valley (8-2-3) 252.00; Sparta (9-6) 227.0; Parsippany Hills (9-6-1) 199.0; West Essex (8-7-1) 186.25; Tenafly (6-7-1) 185.5; Roxbury (5-8-1) 185.25; Indian Hills (4-5-6) 184.50; Montville (5-10) 184.5; West Milford (4-10-2) 181.75; Paramus (6-9-2) 178.75; Dwight-Morrow (8-5-2) 176.0; Cliffside Park (4-6-3) 164.50; Morris Hills (4-8-2) 153.5; Wayne Valley (4-11-3) 140.25; Bergenfield (2-9-2) 132.50; Teaneck (0-12) 58.

    Group 2: Glen Rock (13-2-1) 284.0; Pascack Hills (10-4-1) 248.5; Jefferson (13-5-1) 247.25; Ramsey (10-4-1) 244.0; Mahwah (10-5-1) 240.5; Newton (8-6-2) 221.5; Lakeland (7-6-3) 199.75; Pequannock (12-5) 191.0; Demarest (7-7-2) 179.5; Kinnelon (6-9) 166.5; Elmwood Park (8-8-1) 165.5; River Dell (9-7) 160.5; Hawthorne (6-7-1) 157.25; Lenape Valley (5-7-1) 138.5; Sussex Tech (6-10-2) 138.5; Dumont (4-9-2) 134; Vernon (6-11-1) 129.25; High Point (4-9-1) 124.0; Manchester Regional (1-13-1) 82.5; Kittatinny (1-14) 70.5; Westwood (0-14) 70.

    Group 1: Pompton Lakes (11-3-1) 288.5; Waldwick (12-2-1) 284.5; Wallington (13-2-2) 270.0; Boonton (11-5-2) 218.5; Hasbrouck Heights (11-3-1) 215.25; Emerson Boro (7-6-1) 201; Park Ridge (10-5-1) 200.5; Cresskill (10-6) 193.0; Wallkill Valley (10-4-1) 188.5; Cedar Grove (10-6-1) 181.0; Verona (6-7-1) 180.0; Butler (9-8) 157.5; Saddle Brook (9-6-2) 153.5; North Warren (7-8-1) 146.75; New Milford (5-9-1) 141.5; Midland Park (5-11) 116.0; Wood-Ridge (6-10-1) 104.25; Bergen Charter (4-12) 90.5; Hopatcong (0-16-1) 73.25; Paterson Charter (1-12-1) 72.5; Bogota (0-15-1) 69; West Caldwell Tech (0-12) 52.


    NORTH JERSEY, SECTION 2

    Group 4: Westfield (15-1-1) 367.0; Bridgewater-Raritan (13-0-1) 365.5; Elizabeth (14-2) 291.0; Millburn (9-4-1) 259.75; Columbia (9-6) 250.5; North Hunterdon (8-7) 233.5; Watchung Hills (6-5-2) 224.5; Newark East Side (6-6-2) 222.75; Bayonne (12-6) 212; Scotch Plains-Fanwood (8-10) 211.5; Phillipsburg (6-10-2) 191.0; Piscataway (8-8-1) 180.5; Woodbridge (7-9-2) 167; Ridge (4-9) 162.5; Dickinson (4-9-2) 158.5; Plainfield (5-8) 145.0; J.P. Stevens (5-11-2) 144.75; Linden (1-13-2) 112.5; Union (0-13-2) 88.25; Perth Amboy (1-15) 84; East Orange (1-9) 70.5.

    Group 3: Mendham (12-2) 349.0; Hopewell Valley (15-3-1) 304.0; Somerville (11-5-1) 274.5; Summit (10-6) 246.0; Cranford (9-6) 238.5; Irvington (11-6-1) 233.5; Belleville (10-5-1) 232.5; Middletown North (8-9) 231.5; Orange (8-6-1) 225.5; West Windsor-Plainsboro North (7-6-3) 204.25; Ferris (9-8) 195.5; Warren Hills (6-10-1) 182.75; Rahway (7-6-2) 174.25; Chatham (6-8) 167.5; Nutley (6-10) 160.5; West Morris (2-11) 126.5; Barringer (5-10) 114; Snyder (7-10) 114; Iselin Kennedy (3-15) 84; Colonia (3-15) 81.5; Red Bank Regional (1-14) 78.5.

    Group 2: Harrison (15-2) 339.5; Dover (14-2-1) 319.0; Fort Lee (12-2) 314.5; Hackettstown (14-0-1) 307.5; Science Park (10-3) 281.0; Garfield (11-2-2) 279.0; Newark Central (10-5) 260.5; Mountain Lakes (11-4-1) 241.0; Rutherford (10-5) 238.0; Parsippany (9-6-1) 222.0; Newark Tech (12-5) 217; Morris Tech (8-5-1) 207.0; Caldwell (8-8-1) 205.0; Lyndhurst (9-7) 187.0; Madison (6-7) 182.5; Hanover Park (5-7-1) 177; Lodi (4-9-1) 128.0; West Side (5-11) 103; Ridgefield Park (2-12) 97; Leonia (1-11-1) 94; Whippany Park (1-13) 76.

    Group 1: New Providence (12-4) 274.0; Technology (9-6) 244.0; Secaucus (13-4) 236.5; Becton (12-6) 205.0; Dayton (12-3-1) 201.25; North 13th Street Tech (12-4-1) 196.0; North Arlington (8-8-1) 192.5; Belvidere (9-6-1) 188.0; Roselle Park (6-8-2) 171.5; Ridgefield (7-8) 159.5; Roselle (5-8) 157.5; Palisades Park (5-8-1) 146.0; Glen Ridge (5-9-1) 143.5; Bloomfield Tech (6-8-1) 138; Brearley (4-9-1) 128; Hoboken (6-11) 110.5; METS Charter (6-8-1) 108.0; Shabazz (2-12) 101; Weehawken (3-11-1) 83.5; Newark Collegiate (0-10) 56; Warren Tech (2-11) 56.0; Weequahic (0-9) 53; American History (0-0) 0.


    CENTRAL JERSEY

    Group 4: Hunterdon Central (12-2) 343.0; Monroe (15-1-2) 315.25; Princeton (12-3-1) 300.25; North Brunswick (15-3) 290.0; South Brunswick (13-3-1) 275.25; West Windsor-Plainsboro South (12-3-1) 273.0; Edison (13-3-1) 267.0; Freehold Township (12-6) 258.0; Sayreville (11-5) 255.0; Trenton (10-5-2) 247.75; Long Branch (12-5) 245.5; Montgomery (6-6-1) 226.75; East Brunswick (11-6) 219.5; Hillsborough (6-7-1) 214.0; Middletown South (10-6-1) 211; Old Bridge (10-8) 209; New Brunswick (9-7-2) 203.50; Hightstown (9-8-2) 199.5; Manalapan (5-7-3) 166.5; Franklin (5-8-1) 160.75; Marlboro (1-14-2) 98.50.

    Group 3: Ocean Township (15-2-1) 334.0; Toms River South (11-4-2) 256.0; Northern Burlington (8-6-2) 253.0; Allentown (9-6) 234.0; Moorestown (7-5-3) 220.00; Wall (8-9) 203.0; Toms River East (7-7-1) 199.0; Freehold Borough (8-10-1) 198.5; Lakewood (10-7) 198.0; Lawrence (6-6-2) 197.25; Steinert (5-11-1) 165.75; Pennsauken (6-11) 160; Ewing (2-11-2) 159.5; Neptune (6-8) 157.5; Westampton Tech (8-9) 146; Burlington Township (3-10-2) 145.25; Nottingham (4-10-2) 135.75; Brick Township (2-11-3) 128.50; Colts Neck (6-10-1) 113.5; Jackson Liberty (4-11-1) 105.0; Hamilton West (2-13) 87.

    Group 2: Holmdel (15-1) 300.0; Monmouth (11-8) 221.0; Rumson-Fair Haven (11-5-1) 215.25; Gov. Livingston (6-6-1) 212.25; North Plainfield (5-5-3) 211.75; Carteret (9-8) 208.5; Spotswood (11-7-1) 208.0; Johnson (7-10) 194.5; Metuchen (11-7) 194.5; Voorhees (8-8-2) 187.0; Raritan (7-6-3) 185.25; Bernards (6-4-4) 178.25; Matawan (6-7-2) 165.0; Hillside (9-7) 159.5; Robbinsville (5-8-4) 156.25; North Star Academy (6-10) 150; South Plainfield (6-9-2) 147.5; Delaware Valley (3-14) 130.5; East Brunswick Tech (7-9) 130.0; McNair (3-14) 89; Lincoln (0-0) 0.

    Group 1: Highland Park (13-2-1) 272.5; Asbury Park (12-3) 263; Florence (14-2-1) 256.25; South Hunterdon (9-3-2) 251.5; Bound Brook (8-7-2) 197.75; Stem Civics (10-4) 197.5; Piscataway Tech (8-6-3) 196.5; Manville (10-6-1) 188.25; South River (8-7-2) 187; South Amboy (9-7-1) 182.5; New Egypt (8-7) 182; Point Pleasant Beach (10-6) 180.5; Shore (9-8-1) 178.0; Middlesex (7-11) 154.5; Riverside (8-8) 153; Henry Hudson (4-13) 109.0; Foundation Collegiate (7-6-1) 103.0; Woodbridge Academy (3-11-1) 102.0; Burlington City (4-12) 101; Keyport (4-12) 100; Somerset Tech (4-11-1) 97.5; Edison Academy (3-12-1) 93.5; Perth Amboy Tech (0-13-1) 66.75; Central Jersey College Charter (0-0) 0.


    SOUTH JERSEY

    Group 4: Jackson Memorial (16-2-1) 324.5; Shawnee (11-2-3) 322.5; Washington Township (14-2-1) 322.5; Rancocas Valley (10-4-2) 308.5; Kingsway (10-4-1) 300.0; Williamstown (11-3-3) 295.00; Eastern (10-5-3) 292.75; Atlantic City (15-2-1) 292.0; Brick Memorial (9-5-4) 238.50; Howell (10-6-1) 230.0; Southern (9-7-1) 216.25; Millville (10-6-1) 211.0; Toms River North (6-6-2) 207.75; Cherokee (5-8-2) 197.00; Lenape (7-8-2) 184.0; Egg Harbor (5-10-1) 170.5; Atlantic Tech (9-9) 166.5; Clearview (5-8-3) 162.0; Cherry Hill East (3-12-2) 135.75; Vineland (4-12-1) 122.0.

    Group 3: Ocean City (13-1-1) 360.5; Mainland (14-1-1) 325.5; Pinelands (15-2-1) 299.75; Hammonton (10-2-3) 281.75; Delsea (11-5) 265.5; Absegami (9-6) 245.5; Triton (10-5) 239.0; Seneca (10-5-1) 230.5; Lacey (9-7-1) 200.0; Cherry Hill West (9-7-1) 184.5; Winslow (10-8) 183.0; Timber Creek (7-8-1) 169; Cumberland (8-6-1) 166.0; Gloucester Tech (6-10-2) 165.25; Deptford (5-7-1) 145.75; Bridgeton (2-15) 101.5; Highland (0-12-2) 86.75; Central Regional (1-14) 79.5; Camden Tech (2-3) 35.5; Woodrow Wilson (0-0) 0.

    Group 2: Delran (14-3-2) 347.75; Haddonfield (17-1-1) 342.5; West Deptford (13-3-2) 316.5; Sterling (12-5-2) 270.0; Point Pleasant Boro (10-3-4) 265.25; Cinnaminson (8-5-3) 234.75; Bordentown (11-4-2) 226.25; Oakcrest (9-5-1) 226.0; Middle Township (8-5) 219.0; Collingswood (7-10-1) 187.25; Barnegat (9-8) 184.5; Manasquan (7-9-1) 177.5; Pleasantville (10-5-1) 155; Cedar Creek (6-11) 148.0; Lower Cape May (5-10) 138; Manchester Township (3-13-1) 129.5; Medford Tech (7-9) 102; Overbrook (3-15) 97.5; Pemberton (5-12) 91; Willingboro (1-7) 56.

    Group 1: Glassboro (13-2-2) 354.5; Palmyra (15-2) 301.0; Pitman (13-4) 230.5; Haddon Township (12-4) 226.0; Haddon Heights (7-7-3) 203.25; Schalick (9-8) 203.0; Pennsville (10-4) 202.5; Clayton (12-4-1) 170.0; Penns Grove (9-7-1) 166.5; Lindenwold (8-7-2) 159.00; Audubon (9-8-2) 146.75; Gateway (5-13-1) 146.75; Buena (7-9) 124; Wildwood (5-10) 122.5; Woodbury (6-12) 112.5; Woodstown (3-12-1) 88.5; Salem (4-12) 84.5; Maple Shade (0-16) 72; Gloucester (0-15) 68; Cape May Tech (1-15) 67; Paulsboro (0-14) 52.

    Brian Deakyne may be reached at bdeakyne@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @BrianDeakyne. Like NJ.com High School Sports on Facebook


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    Check in to see where the teams land in the state tournament brackets.

    ROBBINSVILLE -- The NJSIAA girls soccer seeding committee will convene on Wednesday morning and NJ.com will have live coverage of the meeting.

    Tune in a 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday as seeds, pairings, and brackets will be posted as they become available.

    The first round of the tournament will begin on Monday, Oct. 30.

    The tournament will be seeded based off power points as of the cutoff date, which was Saturday, Oct. 21. Check out the final power points below to get a look at how the brackets could come together.

    NJSIAA POWER POINTS THROUGH OCT. 21

    Note: The accuracy of power points is dependent on the timeliness of schools reporting event results to njschoolsports.com. Member schools are also responsible for providing the NJSIAA with the enrollment figures in combined grades 10-12 that are used to determine the group-size equivalent of any opponent that is not a member of the NJSIAA, as well up-to-date records of those teams.

    NORTH JERSEY, SECTION 1

    Group 4: Montclair (11-3) 331.0; Morris Knolls (14-2-1) 306.5; Clifton (10-4-1) 296.0; Livingston (7-5-1) 279.0; West Orange (12-0-3) 278.5; Kearny (14-4) 266; North Bergen (10-5) 256; Morristown (8-5-3) 241.25; Ridgewood (10-5-3) 229.75; Union City (9-5) 221; Randolph (7-6-3) 210.5; Bergen Tech (9-6) 195.0; Bloomfield (6-9-1) 171.0; Passaic Tech (6-7-1) 165.5; Passaic (7-11) 160; Hackensack (5-11) 156.5; Mount Olive (2-13) 110.5; Memorial (2-9) 103; Paterson Eastside (2-10) 88; East Orange (3-8) 66.

    Group 3: Northern Highlands (14-0) 385.0; Ramapo (13-1-1) 346.0; Roxbury (11-2) 343.5; Pascack Valley (14-0-1) 318.0; Wayne Valley (10-4-2) 277.0; Wayne Hills (9-5-1) 257.5; Indian Hills (7-8) 225.0; West Milford (9-7) 216.0; Cliffside Park (9-6-1) 212.75; Fair Lawn (9-9) 209.5; Montville (7-9) 206.5; Old Tappan (9-4-1) 190.25; Paramus (5-11) 157.5; Leonia (8-5-1) 154; Tenafly (4-10) 116; Passaic Valley (4-15) 95; Morris Hills (0-12-1) 81.5; Teaneck (3-12) 75; Dwight-Morrow (1-13) 67; Bergenfield (0-13) 61.

    Group 2: Lakeland (15-2) 316.5; Ramsey (10-1-3) 303.0; Westwood (13-1-1) 301.0; Glen Rock (16-2-1) 297.0; Kittatinny (13-2) 255.5; Hawthorne (11-4) 240.5; Mahwah (7-6-4) 240.0; Newton (16-4) 231.5; Sparta (8-6-2) 213.0; Pequannock (10-5-1) 207.25; River Dell (5-6-5) 200.0; High Point (9-5) 198.0; Jefferson (8-7) 193.5; Pascack Hills (7-8) 162.5; Demarest (6-8) 157; Vernon (7-9-1) 138.25; Dumont (5-11) 121; Elmwood Park (6-11) 115.5; Manchester Regional (1-15) 84; Sussex Tech (3-14-1) 83.0.

    Group 1: Waldwick (13-3) 281.0; Mountain Lakes (12-2-2) 278.00; Park Ridge (12-5) 258.5; Emerson Boro (13-4) 248.5; Midland Park (12-5) 243.5; Pompton Lakes (10-6-1) 197.5; Hasbrouck Heights (11-5) 195.5; Kinnelon (10-7-1) 195.25; Cedar Grove (9-7) 182; New Milford (7-5-2) 169.0; Cresskill (9-6) 165.0; Saddle Brook (7-8) 156.5; Wood-Ridge (5-12) 127; Wallkill Valley (5-8-1) 116.5; Butler (6-10) 107.0; Bergen Charter (1-12) 96; Boonton (1-15) 80.5; North Warren (3-12-1) 78.0; Hopatcong (2-13) 73.5; Paterson Charter (0-12) 53.

    NORTH JERSEY, SECTION 2

    Group 4: Westfield (15-0) 404.0; Bridgewater-Raritan (13-1) 364.5; Ridge (13-3) 349.0; Scotch Plains-Fanwood (12-3) 341.5; Watchung Hills (9-5-1) 335.75; Union (11-4) 264.0; North Hunterdon (9-4) 251.5; Elizabeth (11-5-1) 234.25; Columbia (6-7-1) 231.5; Millburn (9-7) 218.0; Piscataway (9-7) 196; Woodbridge (10-10) 173; Bayonne (7-8) 165; Phillipsburg (4-12-1) 162; Linden (5-10-3) 131.5; J.P. Stevens (4-12) 125.5; Newark East Side (3-12) 112; Dickinson (3-11) 85; Plainfield (2-10) 79.5; Perth Amboy (3-15) 73.

    Group 3: Somerville (10-1-2) 296.75; Chatham (11-4) 280.0; West Morris (8-7-1) 265.75; Mendham (9-4-3) 262.0; Hopewell Valley (11-6-2) 240.5; Middletown South (10-4-4) 240.5; Belleville (10-4) 240.0; Middletown North (12-6) 223.5; Nutley (7-9) 217.0; Colonia (14-6) 202; Cranford (7-8) 195.0; Summit (7-8-1) 176.5; Orange (9-4) 166.5; Warren Hills (5-8-3) 166.00; West Windsor-Plainsboro North (5-10-2) 151.75; Red Bank Regional (4-11) 112; Iselin Kennedy (4-13) 110.5; Ferris (2-12) 95; Irvington (3-7) 79; Barringer (0-0) 0.

    Group 2: Lyndhurst (12-2-2) 299.5; Parsippany Hills (8-6-3) 295.5; Morris Tech (15-1-1) 283.5; Hanover Park (10-5-2) 247.75; West Essex (11-6-1) 246.0; Rutherford (10-4-1) 225.0; Becton (9-2) 207.5; Hackettstown (5-9-2) 182.25; Caldwell (6-9) 165.5; Parsippany (6-11-1) 162.25; Madison (6-7-2) 158.25; Lenape Valley (4-10) 137.5; Fort Lee (7-7) 120; Lodi (3-11-1) 114.25; Garfield (3-13) 114; Science Park (2-11) 88; Dover (4-13) 87.5; Ridgefield Park (3-10) 78; Harrison (1-11) 68; Newark Central (0-7) 35.

    Group 1: Glen Ridge (10-3-1) 290.0; North Arlington (13-3-1) 213.5; McNair (8-7) 205; Hoboken (10-8) 196; Belvidere (8-7-1) 178.5; Roselle Park (13-5) 174.0; Dunellen (8-5) 170; New Providence (8-8) 170.0; Brearley (4-5-4) 151.75; Dayton (6-9-1) 150.0; Verona (5-10) 149.5; Whippany Park (6-10) 143.5; Secaucus (6-7) 128; Somerset Tech (9-6) 127.0; Bloomfield Tech (9-6) 120.5; Bound Brook (2-14) 96; Weehawken (2-11) 84; North 13th Street Tech (1-11) 72; Ridgefield (0-16) 61; Technology (1-12) 51; Warren Tech (1-13-1) 40.

    CENTRAL JERSEY

    Group 4: Freehold Township (17-0) 373.5; East Brunswick (15-2) 314.5; Hunterdon Central (9-4-1) 298.75; Old Bridge (14-3) 278.0; Sayreville (12-4) 269; Franklin (9-7-2) 240.5; Monroe (10-8) 236.5; Edison (14-4) 233; Princeton (8-5-2) 227.5; Manalapan (7-7) 194.0; Hillsborough (3-10) 171; Hightstown (3-12-4) 151.75; Marlboro (6-10-1) 137.5; Montgomery (5-9-1) 136.75; North Brunswick (4-14) 128; South Brunswick (4-11-1) 119.5; West Windsor-Plainsboro South (3-12-1) 109.75; New Brunswick (4-15) 106; Trenton (2-16) 74.5.

    Group 3: Allentown (16-0) 363.0; Steinert (15-1-1) 339.5; Burlington Township (13-3) 295.0; Moorestown (10-7) 262; Colts Neck (10-4) 254.5; Toms River East (9-4) 246.0; Lawrence (8-7-1) 211.5; Freehold Borough (8-7-2) 207.0; Northern Burlington (9-9) 203; Nottingham (9-7) 201.0; Brick Township (8-7-1) 158; Jackson Liberty (8-10) 141; Long Branch (6-12-1) 120.5; Ocean Township (5-11) 120.5; Westampton Tech (5-13) 119.5; Hamilton West (3-13) 102; Neptune (0-13-1) 90; Lakewood (1-14) 78; Pennsauken (0-16) 61.

    Group 2: Wall (17-1-1) 343.0; Johnson (15-1) 310.5; Bernards (14-4-1) 256.0; Robbinsville (7-6-1) 211.0; Rumson-Fair Haven (10-6) 210.5; Spotswood (9-5-2) 203.5; Gov. Livingston (8-7-1) 195.5; Matawan (8-6-2) 160.75; Voorhees (5-11-1) 142.5; Ewing (4-11) 137.5; North Plainfield (4-9) 135.5; Holmdel (4-8-2) 132.25; South Plainfield (2-13-1) 126.25; Carteret (6-12) 125; Delaware Valley (3-13) 125; Hillside (3-9-1) 97; Monmouth (4-16) 90; Rahway (1-15) 88.5; Raritan (2-14) 79.

    Group 1: Metuchen (14-2) 297.0; Highland Park (15-1-1) 290.5; Palmyra (13-2-1) 272.0; Shore (13-4-2) 250.5; Point Pleasant Beach (13-2) 237.0; Maple Shade (13-3) 230.5; Collingswood (10-6-1) 217.25; South River (11-6) 206; Riverside (8-6) 203; New Egypt (8-6) 199; Middlesex (9-8) 194.0; South Hunterdon (8-6) 192; Florence (9-6) 189; Burlington City (6-10) 149; Manville (6-11) 130.5; Willingboro (6-8) 102; Keyport (2-11) 86; Foundation Collegiate (5-5) 73.5; South Amboy (2-16) 69; Central Jersey College Charter (0-0) 0.

    SOUTH JERSEY

    Group 4: Eastern (18-0) 375.5; Kingsway (11-2-2) 369.75; Washington Township (13-2-3) 334.75; Toms River North (16-1) 321.5; Jackson Memorial (15-3) 301.0; Rancocas Valley (9-6-2) 278.0; Egg Harbor (12-2-1) 265.25; Clearview (11-4-1) 253.25; Cherokee (9-8) 251.5; Williamstown (9-6-2) 249.25; Shawnee (10-5-2) 238.75; Millville (9-5) 223.5; Lenape (7-10) 213.5; Cherry Hill East (5-9-2) 164.75; Southern (6-9) 152.0; Brick Memorial (6-10-1) 145.0; Atlantic Tech (5-12) 139; Howell (3-12-1) 118.5; Vineland (1-14) 106.

    Group 3: Ocean City (13-3) 344.5; Mainland (14-2) 330.0; Delsea (15-0-1) 302.0; Lacey (11-4) 274; Deptford (9-7) 218.5; Hammonton (9-7) 207.5; Triton (10-5) 199.0; Gloucester Tech (9-7-1) 196.5; Absegami (9-6-1) 192.75; Cherry Hill West (6-7-4) 169.5; Toms River South (5-9) 150.0; Seneca (6-9-2) 144.75; Highland (5-11) 132.5; Timber Creek (4-13) 127.5; Cumberland (3-11-1) 117.5; Bridgeton (6-11) 108; Central Regional (1-14) 77; Winslow (2-16-1) 70.75; Camden Tech (1-4) 22.

    Group 2: Haddonfield (14-1-1) 347.75; Cinnaminson (13-1-1) 341.75; Manchester Township (13-4) 282; Oakcrest (12-1-2) 280.75; Point Pleasant Boro (11-4-1) 259; Cedar Creek (5-7-2) 238.25; Pinelands (11-6) 229; Pemberton (11-8) 194; West Deptford (8-9) 183.0; Manasquan (6-9-1) 174.5; Middle Township (5-9) 172.5; Lower Cape May (8-8) 151; Sterling (5-10-3) 145.5; Delran (4-13) 130; Bordentown (5-12) 120; Barnegat (6-10-1) 104; Medford Tech (4-13) 101.5; Overbrook (4-15) 97.5; Pleasantville (1-15) 67.

    Group 1: Audubon (16-1-1) 273.25; Haddon Heights (8-7-3) 246.0; Pennsville (14-3) 236.5; Haddon Township (14-4) 228.0; Buena (12-4) 199.0; Gateway (8-7-1) 182.75; Clayton (10-8) 170.0; Woodbury (8-8) 152; Schalick (7-9-1) 151; Pitman (9-6-1) 144.5; Penns Grove (10-9) 136.5; Woodstown (4-9-1) 118.5; Gloucester (2-15-1) 85.5; Lindenwold (2-16) 79; Wildwood (3-11) 79; Glassboro (1-15) 77; Salem (1-16) 70.5; Paulsboro (0-13) 66; Cape May Tech (1-16) 61.

    NON-PUBLIC A

    North JerseyImmaculate Heart (8-3-1) 273.5; DePaul (8-5-1) 253.5; Paramus Catholic (10-5) 239.0; Oak Knoll (10-5-1) 234.0; Pingry (6-6-2) 219.5; Dwight-Englewood (9-4-1) 218.0; Kent Place (8-8-1) 213.75; Mount St. Dominic (9-6) 204.5; Pope John (7-7-2) 192.0; Holy Angels (3-13-1) 144.25; Union Catholic (3-11-2) 111.0; Mother Seton (1-16) 80.

    South JerseySt. John Vianney (12-1-4) 282; Mount St. Mary (12-4-1) 272.5; Red Bank Catholic (11-6-1) 262.5; Notre Dame (11-4-2) 252.0; Bishop Eustace (10-4-2) 219.75; Paul VI (9-7-2) 219.0; Bishop Ahr (9-6-1) 183; Gloucester Catholic (8-7) 180.5; St. Rose (7-8-1) 178.0; Immaculata (3-7-1) 123.25; Camden Catholic (2-13-2) 119.0; Donovan Catholic (4-12) 104.

    NON-PUBLIC B

    North JerseyMorris Catholic (15-3) 299.0; Montclair Kimberley (13-4-1) 229.0; St. Dominic (8-8) 191; Morristown-Beard (7-5-2) 184.50; Villa Walsh (5-5-4) 182.50; Lodi Immaculate (9-7) 170; Newark Academy (5-7-1) 160.5; Eastern Christian (7-7-3) 158.0; Golda Och (7-4) 156; Hawthorne Christian (5-11-1) 111.25; St. Elizabeth (7-12-1) 98; Saddle River Day (2-9) 95.5; Hudson Catholic (2-10) 94; Benedictine (2-14) 81; Mary Help of Christians (6-6) 72; Lacordaire (0-5) 25.

    South JerseyRutgers Prep (15-2) 272.5; Moorestown Friends (8-4-1) 241.25; Holy Spirit (12-4) 233.5; Calvary Christian (Old Bridge) (13-2) 228.0; Our Lady of Mercy (11-5) 215.5; Gill St. Bernard's (10-4-1) 215; Holy Cross (7-8) 193; Timothy Christian (9-8) 187; Wardlaw-Hartridge (7-8-1) 166.75; St. Joseph (Hamm.) (8-5-1) 159; Doane Academy (6-9) 152.0; Trinity Hall (7-6-1) 152; Ranney (5-7) 103; Roselle Catholic (4-9-1) 100.5; Wildwood Catholic (4-8) 98; Mater Dei (0-11) 58; Trenton Catholic (0-0) 0.

    Brandon Gould may be reached at bgould@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @BrandonGouldHSLike NJ.com HS sports on Facebook.


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    Week 8 of New Jersey football is loaded with some of the best games of the year.


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    This new play by Karen Rizzo is cucrently having its East Coast premiere at Long Branch's New Jersey Repertory Company

    In Karen Rizzo's "Mutual Philanthropy," now receiving its East Coast premiere at Long Branch's New Jersey Repertory Company, booze and sexual tension combine to fuel an explosive night between two couples.

    This is a formula we've seen before: from Edward Albee's 1962 classic "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" to James Hindman's "Multiple Family Dwelling," which had its world premiere on this same stage just seven months ago, playwrights have returned again and again to the particularly volatile condition of an alcohol-soaked night of uncomfortable revelations.

    Rizzo may not meet entirely the challenge of finding room for a fresh take on this increasingly cliched plot, but the playwright does carve out a bit of new space for "Mutual Philanthropy" by exploring the issue of economic inequity.

    Our first couple is Esther (Vivia Font) and Lee (Joseph Carlson): young, principled, struggling financially. She does not make much money at a bakery, and he is an artist who crafts ambitious sculptures that rarely sell. Couple number two is aspiring super-mom Michelle (Laurel Casillo) and wealthy-and-he-knows-it investment banker Charles (James MacDonald). These two are a bit older, a lot richer, and completely enamored with what they perceive as the authentic romance between the Latina baker and starving artist.

    The two couples come together for a dinner party because the wealthy folks tell the poor folks that they have something important to discuss. Esther thinks they intend to purchase Lee's newest sculpture, but Michelle and Charles have something a bit more nuanced in mind.

    It is the particulars of the proposal made over too much wine and whisky that mark out some unique space for "Mutual Philanthropy." But ultimately the 75-minute play spends more time within tropes than complicating them. With telegraphed and unsurprising sexual tension, a script littered with platitudes like "You two deserve each other," heavy-handed symbolism, and an over-reliance on alcohol to do the hard work of producing divisiveness, the play lays bare the seams of its construction.

    Certainly all of the cast members do well to bring the anxiety of their characters to life. Under the direction of Evan Bergman, the ensemble dedicates itself to locating and accentuating that which eats at each character; the result is a clear picture of four uniquely troubled people. Set designer Jessica Parks's keen eye for the bourgeois-dying-to-be-bohemian decor of Charles and Michelle's home does important work to underscore the separate worlds of these two couples.

    Occasionally staging underdeveloped work is of course a risk tied to mounting new plays. But during a New Jersey theater season awash with screen-to-stage adaptations and safe, butts-in-seats classics, it is worth taking a moment to commend the NJ Rep for its dedication to the admirable and important mission of producing exclusively new plays. As space for new work seems to dwindle around the country, playwrights have in Long Branch a valuable resource.

    Mutual Philanthropy

    The NJ Repertory Company

    179 Broadway, Long Branch

    Tickets available online at www.njrep.org. Running through November 19

    Patrick Maley may be reached at patrickjmaley@gmail.com. Find him on Twitter and Instagram @PatrickJMaley. Find NJ.com/Entertainment on Facebook. 


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    A look at the top sophomores in New Jersey.


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    Hot on the heels of two new Homesense stores, Monmouth County will welcome a pair of Kirkland's

    Need to spice up the inside (or outside) of your Jersey Shore home? Homeowners in Monmouth County are in luck as two new options are set to open.

    Kirkland's, a national home decor chain, is opening locations this Saturday at the Consumer Centre in West Long Branch (310 State Route 36) and the Freehold Raceway Mall (3710 Route 9 South). The latter location previously housed a Kirkland's that closed in 2010.

    The news of the openings was first reported by the Asbury Park Press.

    The Nashville-based store told the Asbury Park Press both stores will open at 10 a.m. Saturday, and will have a grand opening celebration on Nov. 4.

    Debra Panzarella, a Freehold Raceway Mall spokeswoman, told the paper that the store in their mall is "really filling a void," and will complement Arhaus Furniture, which is next door.

    Kirkland's sells indoor and outdoor furniture, rugs and curtains, kitchenware, holiday decor, mirrors, lamps, and really anything else you can envision in your home.

    The news of the openings comes on the heels of Kirkland's opening their first Jersey Shore store in Brick in May, and Homesense, a juiced-up version of sister store HomeGoods, opening a location in Ocean Township this month to much delight. (Homesense's first store opened in East Hanover in September.)

    According to the Asbury Park Press, Kirkland's hours at the Freehold Raceway Mall location will be 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sundays. The West Long Branch store will be Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays.

    Joe Atmonavage may be reached at jatmonavage@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @jatmonavageNJFind NJ.com on Facebook


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    Officials say Army Pfc. Richard Lucas' remains were recently identified.

    The remains of a New Jersey soldier who went missing during the Korean War will be buried next month at Arlington National Cemetery.

    Officials say Army Pfc. Richard Lucas' remains were recently identified.

    The 17-year-old Monmouth man was reported missing in November 1950. He was serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, which was located in defensive positions in an area northeast of Kujang, North Korea.

    In August and September 2002, a joint recovery operation located remains at a site in the North Pyongan province of North Korea, which was believed to have been a temporary prison camp.

    Scientists used DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

     

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